IN UTERO

An exploration of research into how maternal physical and mental health impacts the development of baby’s brains during pregnancy.

In Utero at the Science Museum

Developments in MRI, a medical imaging tool, have allowed researchers to see babies’ brains in incredible detail and to investigate how they change in the womb and after birth.

However, questions remain about how maternal physical and mental health impact the development of babies’ brains. Improved understanding could enable better detection and even prevention of developmental conditions.

Taking inspiration from conversations with parents from Guy’s and St Thomas’ Maternity Voices Partnership and medical imagery, In Utero takes you back to a place of wonder and mystery- the womb.

In Utero allows you to immerse yourself in the multi-sensory sculpture and reconnect with your place of origin. Reflect on the factors that impact women’s pregnancy and consider our collective role in supporting expectant parents and, in turn, shaping the health of the next generation.

Artists x Scientist

Stiliyana Minkovska

Stiliyana Minkovska is a Masters student at the Royal College of Art and Imperial College London. She is a qualified architect and a multidisciplinary designer with a strong passion for maternal health and well-being.

Sarah Schrimpf

Sarah Schrimpf is a Masters Student at the Royal College of Art. She is a visual artist working predominantly with photography and moving image.

Wushang Tong

Wushuang Tong is a Masters student at the Royal College of Art. As an artist, cellist and researcher, her work spans across painting, installation, music, and poetry.

Julie Sigurdardottir

PhD student at King’s College London and mother of three. Her research focuses on using MRI to better understand how maternal physical and mental health impacts the development of baby’s brains during pregnancy.